Building a Strong Character

An education that goes beyond academics

By Daniel Beauregard

For many parents, a good education means much more than academics. While reading, math, and science are all important, having their child learn about such values as kindness, respect, and empathy for others is just as important, if not more so. Fortunately, most Atlanta area public and independent schools incorporate some form of character education in their curricula, placing an emphasis on guiding children to become caring, involved members of society. Continue reading

Moving on Up

Easing into Middle and High School

By Whitney Brennan

The transitions to middle and high school can be daunting for both children and parents. And the stress of those transitions is only compounded when you’re relocating to a new city or a new neighborhood. Middle and high school students enter larger schools and have to learn to cope with more peers, new teachers, and unfamiliar subjects, as well as becoming the youngest students in the school—again. Continue reading

Benefits of a Boarding School

Making an educated decision about your child’s future

By Phil Keeling

Mention the words “boarding school,” and many people may immediately think of images conjured from books and films. These images often go from one extreme to another: whether they’re drab, military inspired classrooms filled with unruly and troubled students that require discipline and uniformity, or elitist institutions reserved for the super wealthy. These impressions are particularly common in America, where parents may have far less experience with the boarding school environment, and often misunderstand their benefits. Continue reading

What It’s Like to Teach Your Child

Educators Share Their Joys And Struggles

By Michelle Bourg

Teaching has to be one of the most rewarding professions there is. Helping to mold the next generation, seeing “the light come on” when they finally grasp an elusive concept, watching as their confidence and skills grow day by day— teachers cite all these things as what has inspired them to enter the field and what continues to motivate them in the classroom during every school year. Continue reading

Left Out of the IN Crowd

Dealing with School Cliques

By Michelle Bourg

Things are going well: your children are enrolled in a good school, doing well in their classes and seem to be happy. Then one day, your second-grader comes home in tears after finding out she was the only one not invited to Susie’s birthday party. Or your usually gregarious high-schooler becomes withdrawn and is noncommittal when asked about his friends. They’re experiencing something virtually every child encounters at some point during their school years: cliques. Continue reading

The Learning Curve

Strategies To Help Your Child Study Better

By Michelle Bourg

You check in on your kids, and it’s a typical scene: Your oldest is buried in a book and oblivious to “Sesame Street” blasting from the TV as your middle child recites along. Meanwhile, your youngest has taken the game controller apart. All children have their own ways of processing information, or what educational theorists commonly call learning styles. By getting a sense of how your child learns best—his or her learning style—you can help them study and learn more effectively to achieve and build on success at school. Continue reading

Balancing Sports Life

How To Support Your Child On And Off The Field

By Michelle Bourg

Whether it’s Pee Wee Soccer, Little League or “Friday night lights,” youth sports are an American tradition. And that’s a great thing: in addition to providing the physical benefits of exercise, it’s been consistently shown that kids’ involvement in sports boosts self-esteem, improves academic performance, reduces the likelihood of engaging in risky behaviors and teaches important social skills, including teamwork, goal setting and emotional resilience. Nurturing your child’s involvement in sports offers definite benefits, but also demands active parental planning and involvement to maintain a balance with other aspects of growing up. For parents of young athletes, maintaining that balance is almost a sport in itself. Continue reading

Tech in the Classroom

How Technology Is Helping Kids Learn

By Pamela Briggs

The pencil was the latest invention 450 years ago. Now we have devices that know our schedules, robots that learn and self-driving vehicles are coming down the road. It’s become increasingly important to ask ourselves: How do we choose good tech tools, and then use them carefully and wisely to do the job well? Continue reading

Gaining Steam

Exploring the Benefits of Stem and Steam Education

By Michelle Bourg

A well-rounded curriculum used to be “The Three Rs,” or “reading, writing and arithmetic.” Today, STEM, and STEAM are becoming the dominant measure of what students need to learn. But what exactly are STEM and STEAM, and how are they different from traditional learning? Do they offer any real benefit to your child? A closer look shows that STEM and STEAM education is an approach that offers students real benefits and will change how they learn and prepare for the future. Continue reading

Adjusting to a New School

How to Make Your Child’s Transition Easier

By Michelle Bourg

As the old saying goes, “Nothing is constant except change.” All change requires some adjustment, from a new baby to a rescheduled dental appointment. This can be difficult for adults, let alone for children, who thrive on routine and have fewer coping skills.

From preschool to college, starting or changing schools is a dramatic—and a potentially traumatic—milestone for a youngster. School is the place where children establish an identity and relationships outside the family circle—changing schools requires them to establish them over again. Plus, we’re human: the unfamiliar is scary.

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